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Webinar: We Eat with our Eyes – April, 15 2020

The situation surrounding COVID-19 continues to change everyone’s business and personal routines daily. We recognize all businesses are dealing with a new reality. We understand face-to-face touch point you want to have more. It is an ambiguous environment to be sure. So we thought to keep our minds engaged and stimulated this webinar could help you.

This presentation will include best practices and resources to elevate food and plate presentation, texture and taste from regular meals to the IDDSI including soft, minced and pureed diets. Come join us to learn more about how to elevate your patient/resident meal experiences with dignity and taste. Objectives:

• Strategies to enhance your populations’ food intake

• Identify the satisfiers of tray presentation

• Learn the meal assembly and meal delivery merchandising tips to increase satisfaction and increase the positive meal service experience

One CEU credit is available.

Presented by Marsha Diamond, MA, RDN President, Diamond Approach Foodservice Branding and Sales Strategist New Business Development Non-Commercial and Hospitality Foodservice Specialist Website: marshadiamond.com.

Sponsored by AHF-NJ, Alluserv and Lakeside Foodservice.

REGISTER HERE

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Webinar: Robotics in Healthcare Delivery

Marsha Diamond, MA, RDN, and Chris Anderson, Regional VP, Aethon will be sharing what you need to know about mobile robots and your applications in healthcare operations.  The use of mobile robots is increasing throughout multiple industries and geographies and this has resulted in a significant expansion of the needs and expectations by the end-user. These demands are resulting in applications with very specific requirements, price-points, end-points, and user interaction needs. The challenge is that no one mobile robot can do all things or serve all markets – so how do you choose and evaluate for your situation? In this webinar, we will discuss the considerations to understand the value and incorporate mobile robots into their process flows and workforce and even interact among their customers, guests or patients. 

Objectives:

  1. Learn the scope and parameters to utilize mobile robotics in your environments- meal delivery, environmental, laundry and retail venues
  2. Understand the efficiencies and ROI to your operations
  3. Get a better understand of the value adds and benefits of using mobile robotics to your employees, patients, residents and facilities.

For this one-hour program, one CEU credit is available.

Presenters:

Marsha Diamond - MA, RDN, Foodservice Consultant

Chris Anderson - Regional Vice President, Aethon Robotics

Recorded Webinar

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Umami – The 5th Flavor

Umami Saves The Taste (Buds): Elevating Food Flavor

Imagine you’re out to eat, about to be served. You know the food is ready when you smell the aroma from a few feet away. When it arrives to the table, your mouth begins to water at the sight of the dish you’ve been looking forward to. You take a bite, but it tastes bland. This can be rather disappointing if you have been anticipating a delicious meal. This is your senses at work. We use senses such as sight, hearing, smell, touch and taste to make judgments about the food we eat. We eat with our eyes first, smell second and taste last. Taste is the most influential in determining our enjoyment of a food. You might be familiar with the basic tastes like sweet, sour, salty and bitter, but we have an additional taste, also known as Umami.

Umami is a savory taste imparted by glutamate, found in dishes like meat, fish, vegetables and dairy products. The goal of Umami is to bring out the natural flavors in food and ultimately, enhance the flavoring of the food. Increasing the use of Umami in dishes could:

  1. Introduce new ingredients to food - The primary role of Umami is to make food more flavorful, but it also changes how our dishes are prepared. Umami can be used on its own or in conjunction with other flavors and foods, which opens up new ideas on traditional recipes.
  2. Increase food acceptability and consumption - When a food tastes good, we normally want to eat more of it. This is especially important when trying to increase intake of foods like fruits and vegetables. Umami can influence the perceptions of these foods in dishes and increase their overall acceptance on the plate.
  3. Reduce food waste - On the contrary, we naturally leave more food on the plate when we don’t like it. This can add to the pile of food wasted on a daily basis. Umami has the potential to reduce food waste by increasing the desirability of the dish. 
  4. Enhance overall customer experience - One of the most common objectives of a foodservice operation is to give the customer the best experience possible. If the food tastes good, there is higher customer satisfaction. This increases the chances might even recommend and rave about the food!

Try a simple taste test with your team. Add Umami to a portion of soup and one without. We have experienced this test and the difference was significant as adding Umami gave the broth a savory feel, without interfering with the texture or the presentation of it. Umami’s usage can have a huge impact on how your patients and customers enjoy their food. You may be surprised on the impact on the enjoyment of future dining experiences too, especially in those who have compromised or diminished taste buds due to illnesses or aging. Umami can give these populations better eating and tasting experiences thus, better consumption and nutrition.

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Sleep Can Affect the Workplace

“Sleep is for the weak” is a phrase commonly used to influence people to stay awake for longer hours, but have we considered the toll that a lack of sleep can take on health? At this year’s food nutrition conference and expo, there was session titled, Best of the Rest, that proposed sleep being a piece of the health puzzle with food choices and exercise too, presented by Dr. Michael Grandner.

Sleep is a biological process that starts with our sleep drive and our biological clock.  In this process, our body recovers and repairs from the day. So, what are the consequences of a lack of sleep?

Nutritionally, a lack of sleep can impair the immune system, putting us at a higher risk of getting sick. Also, those who aren’t getting enough sleep tend to gain weight and have higher susceptibility to chronic health conditions like obesity and hypertension. Not only are there health consequences (higher disability and insurance costs), but exhausted employees can have just as much of a negative impact on the workplace environment (productivity levels, falls, mistakes)

A lack of sleep increases our sleep drive, meaning, we feel more tired as we go about our day. Our brain is constantly sending signals to the body that we need rest. This is why we have a harder time concentrating when we are tired. Inadequate sleep makes it difficult to make complex decisions, resulting in a lack of effective communication amongst team members. This can hinder productivity levels and set the tone of their environment daily. Currently, over 30% of people don’t get good sleep.

 Steps that can be taken to ensure you and your team members get your z’s?

  1. Your work environments-consider the design of Zen gardens and rest venues. Napping boosts alertness and accuracy.  Nappers are more alert, respond faster and better, and make fewer mistakes. Even a 20-minute nap was found to improve alertness and performance among shift workers.
  2. Replicate these type of design for employees -Recharge rooms, nap pods.
  3. Inservice training included with orientations, etc. to educate what can tips to  get a better-quality sleep.
  4. picking an optimal time and amount of sleep. The recommended amount of sleep is 7-9 hours for adults.
  5. Minimize any light exposure during sleep can also disturb the sleep cycle.
  6. Avoid smart devices or tv screens before going to sleep
  7. Minimize or avoid smoking and alcohol several hours before your bedtime

Keep in mind that these recommendations go hand in hand with a healthy lifestyle, food options and exercise. Promoting lifestyle practices in the workplace can have plenty of benefits including: reduced health care costs, increased concentration for effective decision making and overall, higher workplace productivity.

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Webinar: Food Safety & Food Allergies

One out of every 10 adults has a food allergy.

At least 8% of children under the age of 18 have a food allergy.

Are you ready for this number of food-allergic patrons, visitors, patients, clients, students, friends and family to visit your establishment?

You need to be, as the time and option for ignoring these customers is coming to an end. By utilizing best practices, adhering to labeling laws, accessing available tools and resources, you’ll be able to mitigate risks!

Webinar Objectives:

  1. Easily identify the top 8 food allergens in the United States.
  2. Use best practices when handling food allergy requests.
  3. Recognize current labeling laws and exemptions with food allergens.
  4. Understand how the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), Section 504 Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and food allergies impact your establishment.

Presenters:

Jordan H. Maeson, MD - National consultant and expert speaker on food allergies.

Marsha Diamond - MA, RDN, Foodservice Consultant

Video of Presentation

PDF of Presentation

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Webinar: Food and Foodservice Trends and Solutions

A trend is a regular change in processes, conditions, data, projects, etc. To follow a trend, you must be aware of the current situation and be able to predict future changes.

The beginning of the year is traditionally the time that trends are forecasted in all spheres. And yet, before we even have time to get used to new ideas, equipment and technology, they become outdated and are replaced by newer ones. It’s important to be aware and monitor the foodservice landscape in order to take full advantage of sales opportunities, customer loyalty and satisfaction, maximizing efficiencies and more.

OBJECTIVES:

  1. Acquire an understanding of 2019 food and foodservice trends and solutions.
  2. Learn adaptable solutions to these trends that can be executed in retail foodservice today to elevate your customer experiences, loyalty and revenue.
  3. Obtain knowledge to develop a retail foodservice roadmap for success.

 

PRESENTERS:

Nancy Lane - Senior Designer, Visual Merchandising & Product Concepts, Lakeside Manufacturing, Inc.

Marsha Diamond - MA, RDN, Foodservice Consultant

Video of Presentation

PDF of Presentation

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Webinar: Food as Medicine – Part 2

The “food-as-medicine” movement has been around for decades, but it’s making inroads as physicians and medical institutions make food a formal part of treatment, rather than relying solely on medications. By prescribing nutritional changes or launching educational programs, they’re trying to prevent, limit or even reverse disease by changing what patients eat. Join us as Jim McGrody, Director of Culinary Services, UNC Rex Healthcare Raleigh, NC, shares his expertise and stories about the power of serving nutritious, appealing food in hospitals. At this important juncture, there are opportunities to set goals, build on successes, and learn from his experience. We continue our discussion with Jim from our last webinar on May 25th.

Recording of Webinar

PDF of Presentation

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Webinar: Food as Medicine – Part 1

In this webinar, Alluserv presents two guest speakers who explain how the “food as medicine” movement is being adopted within healthcare facilities.  Topics include: new relevant terminology, developing action plans, and determining who leads, executes and adopts these plans.  Speakers include Aatul Jain, Sr. Executive Chef at St. Peter’s University Hospital in New Brunswick, NJ; Dr. Veronica McLymont, Director of Food and Nutrition Services at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY.

Recording of Webinar

PDF of Presentation

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Grandma and George Jetson Come to Dinner

The culinary world is forever changing, as new technology and scientific evidence shapes how people perceive food, health and the overall dining experience. It seems that people are trying to get back to basics - attempting to form better relationships with their food and understanding where it comes from. We are starting to become more aware of what we’re eating and what is going on our plates. In 2018, we can expect to see an increase in seasonal cooking and more plant-based diets. As our knowledge of certain foods and their health benefits increases, we are now becoming alert to things like gut health and how fermented foods can help with our digestion and overall health.

This year, we can expect to see the comeback of quite a few “old-age” themes with food and the actual dining experience. There has already been an increase of zero waste bulk-buy stores as people are becoming more aware of the amount of waste they produce, and that trend does not seem to be slowing down anytime soon. These stores also tend to sell organic and sustainable foods and honestly make the grocery shopping fun! Another comeback we can expect to see is the experience of dining as a social event, not just sitting and eating food like it’s a chore. Some restaurants have already started introducing ‘communal dining’, where people can sit down with friends, family or complete strangers which can enhance your dining experience...well, depending on who is sitting at the table with you.

However, sustainability is an issue that food manufacturers, scientists and food engineers need to overcome due to the growing population and the depleted resources that we will face in the not-so-distant future. Finding sustainable methods of food production is going to be the main goal over the next few years, kicking off in 2018. Waste production is going to be a major focus this year, as breakthroughs in nano-packaging and 3D printing will change the way foods are not only packaged, but also cooked and stored. Nano-packaging has already shown to give foods a much longer shelf life, without the use of preservatives. As people become more conscious of what food they are consuming, information platforms will become readily available to help educate people on waste production all the way to the chemical compositions of foods.

Overall, the entire world of food and hospitality is going to change in 2018. From the change in diets, what foods are available and how we consume them to how foods are grown, produced and packaged. It’s going to be a long year ahead, but remember:

One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.- Virginia Woolf

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Patients Eat With Their Eyes First

How a food looks tell the patient a lot about the food and the foodservice team accountability and experience. People use the way a food looks to judge the food for freshness and quality. When the food is visually appealing to a patient, you accomplish your mission of providing nourishment for the recovery and healing of your patients.

COLOR, SHAPE, SIZE AND POSITION OF FOOD MATTERS IN VISUAL APPEAL

COLOR: The most impactful eye appeal

  • Break up the colors
  • Enhance the colors
  • Make it “glisten”
  • Keep the colors natural

SHAPE: Ingredients

  • Vary the cuts of ingredients
  • Add textures to the dish

STYLE: Arranging ingredients, plating

  • Traditional – The Y style of plating
  • Modern plating
  • Simplicity

Aroma Strategies:

  • Include variety
  • Add flavor to comfort food
  • Herbs add color, taste and smell
  • Cooking techniques can enhance aroma and experience
  • Be aware of visual placement on the tray, temperature awareness, less is more, easy to handle and maneuver on tray space

For more on this topic, click here to watch Alluserv's last webinar!